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20131202
20131210
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inspire us. i said no, mr. mandela, you inspire us. so there was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inaccept raable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today congressman was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions made by mandela and other apartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided non-violence was not enough, they have been so committed to nonviolence, even in the face of incredible brutality, they needed some sort of military response as well. never ended up being the khai part of their response to apartheid, but they made that hard decision. how international were those discussions about the importance of non-violence and whether or not it was enough to overthrow governments and to change the world? >> here in america and around the world, there was ongoing discussion about the way of peace, the way of love, the way of non-vi
to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you, you inspired us. and i said, no, mr. mandela, you inspired us. so that was just unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time, the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inseparable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today, congressman, was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions that was made by mandela and other anc leaders and other antiapartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided that nonviolence wasn't enough. they had been committed to nonviolence in the way that you have been so overtly committed to nonviolence, throughout your life, throughout those struggles, even in the face of incredible physical brutality, and they decided when they saw those people massacred, they needed some kind of military response as well. never ended up being a key response of their response to apartheid, but they made that hard decision. how interna
mandela. flags across the country remain at half-staff and will stay that way until mr. mandela is buried. michelle kaczynski is outside his home. tell us what you are seeing there. >> singing and dancing until at least 3:00 in the morning. even on the second day. i think what immediately strikes you and touches you is the incredible diversity of this crowd. people still coming together with their entire families and their friends. they will come here with a feeling of togetherness of truly moving sense of community. one boy 7 years old, drew a picture of house and trees. he drove here from a tiny village four hours away. she said a school was built. she said because of mandela, her child and the other kids there have a good education. plus, a huge pad of flowers on the gates lead to go mandela's home. people having their own gatherings. they will come here where they feel closer to mandela where he lived as well as closer to each other. >> michelle, we're having a little bit of trouble hearing your audio. i have to tell you what i love is how this nation, their mourning is so joyful. the
africa. >> we are one country. we are one people. >> one excludes the religious leaders, mr. mandela is the greatest person to have walked the face of the earth in human history. >> reporter: an icon not only for his fellow countrymen -- >> viva mandela! viva! >> reporter: -- but for the entire world. "nelson mandela." >> ladies and gentlemen. >> this is "headliners "headliners & legends" with lester holt. >> he is lauded the world over as a man of peace, a champion for the downtrodden. he suffered at the hands of racism and endured decades in prison only to emerge with his dignity intact, his spirit unbroken freedom fighter, ex-prisoner, nation builder. nelson mandela's legacy serves as a shining example not only for the people of the world today but for generations to come. >> reporter: nelson mandela's life begins far away from the turmoil, struggles and ultimate triumphs that will define his life. here in the transsky province of south africa, 550 miles south of johannesburg, mandela is born on july 18th, 1918. the name he is given will prove in a sense prophetic. >> nelson mande
's a street party that continues on now for several days since mr. mandela's death was announced on thursday evening here. the street has been filling with marchers, with choirs, with schoolchildren, with ordinary people who have come from far and near to be here, to be part of a celebration of mr. mandela's life. all of this is perhaps a day of anticipation because tomorrow about a mile or so from here, that huge soccer stadium that seats some 80,000 people, there will be countless people gathering to come to mourn, to come and breathe and celebrate mr. mandela's life. it may be the largest organization ever, perhaps rivaling the services for pope john paul ii when there were 70 heads of state, kings and queens. we are hearing there will bow 50 or 60 heads of state. leaders from as far away as new zealand and australia also coming here. although the american delegation, as you mentioned, which was scaled down based on the wishes of the south african government, they are trying to limit this. there is just a huge outpouring for mr. mandela and literally the world wants to be here. millions m
and since thursday night when mr. mandela's passing was announced. tomorrow will be truly significant and unique event. there are perhaps 95,000 people who will be allowed into the stadium and there will be tens and thousands more who will be try to be near there. the event of course is captivated the country and the world. security will be unprecedented. the south african security forces used protecting mr. mandela, the secret service and security forces here are sfam with protecting with mr. mandela. this is not an unknown island. of course, anything is possible about the they are taking unprecedented steps to make sure the stadium is secure. the treats in the area near here will be closing down in a couple of hours and private vehicles will not be allowed anywhere near the stadium. it is expected to be an emotional day. the program has just been released and there will be remarks by several of mr. mandela's grandchildren and comments from a former political prisoner along with him who served 26 years on rob bin island and remarks from heads of states like president obama and leader
forth that legacy. >> and you first met mr. mandela right after being released from jail. you were in a room alone with him. tell me about that moment. you're young, 20 and impressionable and looking for your place and 20 years later you would be the ambassador for south africa. what happened in that room? >> really pretty incredible to me and hilarious in retrospect. this was immediately after the ticker tape parade we had and i escorted him into city hall, and next i knew we were alone. i discovered in moments of silence, had a weightiness to him. i was probably staring at him awe struck for ten minutes then a voice said, young man, may i trouble you for a glass of water. he said it with a little slight i am patience and it became clear he probably asked several times but i was so dumb struck by him that my feet were rooted. of course, i hurried and got him water and never ever had such pleasure in providing service to another human being. i just wished i could have done more in his service and for his cause. >> we hear people say that nelson mandela is the moral compass for sout
mr. obama travelled to see the cell where mandela was held for nearly two decades. he described his relationship to the man he and many others affectionately called madiba. >> he is a personal hero and i don't think i am u meek in that regard. he's a hero for the world. >> back this south africa, the mood is part sadness, but part celebration. crowds gathered to remember nelson mandela who changed the world by committing his to the freedom of the south african people. >> i have nothing but deep gratitude they have given to me as an individual and let me state this. they were able to achieve anything, i know that this is because i am the servant of the people of south africa. >> it has been more than two decades since nelson mandela walked out of prison, but for those who lived through it, it seemed to be a piece of a larger puzzle. consider when mandela was freed, we were less than a year removed from china's tianamen square. the berlin wall came down the previous november. it was a fleeting moment in history, but for a time it showed humanity around the world was headed in the righ
. mandela and mrs. mandela in the flat in london. it was a small apartment. we met and it was extraordinary. i was in the room with living history. i was in the presence of greatness. this man's humility about the combination, there is no question that nelson mandela was a man who embodied what martin luther king jr. talked about in referring to the spirit of the times. here was a man who was out of a sense of directioning history and those around him. a man who didn't presume to be the mouth piece for god. nevertheless spoke for millions of people not only in south africa, but around the world. the courage it took to for give south africa into its future. his love ethic that they spoke about was the predicate for the expansion of opportunity for africans who were black to join with africans who were white and others to forge the future of that nation. what's interesting as many criticize mr. obama here, president obama who was encouraged by him. i was at the white house when the film was screened. i had the opportunity to see barack obama introduce a film about nelson mandela was a bit of
. i was the wife of a south african freedom fighter, belonged to a rival organization than mr. mandela's. my husband was a pat, pan african congress, mr. mandela was founder of anc, african national congress, others south african national union. i was used to those men and a few women shouting and screaming at each other. they were really arch rivals. when mr. mandela came, he didn't raise his voice. he didn't argue with anybody. he didn't put anybody down. they were rivals. i had never met a south african who wasn't shouting and really angry all the time. i know he was angry, but he didn't use his energy foolishly. so it was a year after that he was imprisoned. i became friends with his wife then, winnie mandela. and we continued to support each other over the years and over the oceans. and she would tell me how he was. he wasn't vitt uperative with t guards. i was part of hillary clinton's delegates when he was inaugurated. i sat there and watched the guards, who had guarded him for 27 years, sitting in the right sights, in the best seats, invited by mr. mandela. not to say look how
coming here throughout the past few days since mr. mandela's death was announced. they have been singing in the streets, they have been chanting. it's been more street party than anything else celebrating the life of mr. mandela. obviously there's also some grief and mourning but most people are trying to focus on the positive, the legacy and the tremendous achievement of mr. mandela and this country during his life. also you have to remember that all these events are taking place over a week. there's the memorial service tomorrow and then for the next three days after that, mandela's body will lie in state at the union builds, the seat of government in pretoria and the body will make a procession from the military hospital to that place each day so there will be people trying to line that route and see what's happening as well to visit the body and pay their respects. and finally the funeral in a distant part of the country where mr. mandela is from, so many events over many days and a lot of emotion overall that. >> ron, thank you. checking the news feed this morning, that massive wint
, he has a very close relationship with nelson mand a mandela. their lives are intertwined. mr. obama has said that his first political act as an individual was in support oh of the anti apartheid movement, which mr. mandela, of course, was leading. so there's that. we expect that this could be one of the largest gatherings of heads of states ever together assembled in one place. it's an event that will perhaps rival the funeral of pope john paul ii back in 2005. some 3 million converged upon the vatican. the numbers here at the football stadium where the main event will be held could be as many as 100,000 or so. there are several other venues in the johannesburg area where people will watch on giant televisions. and countless others will cram the streets to get near this area where there will be this huge event going on. and don't forget, after tomorrow, there are still three days of official mourning, where mandela's body will lie in state at the union buildings at the capital. and a final state funeral in qunu where mr. mandela was born and grew up. a week-long series of events, fu
york city, mr. mandela, you inspired us. >> we entered into a covenant, which i billed to society in which all, both black and white, will be able to walk tall without any fear in their hearts. assured a right of human dignity, a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell in washington. he was his nation's great emancipator. south african, the born-free generation who never lived under apartheid are celebrating the life of nelson mandela. prisoner, revolutionary, father of a rainbow nation. michelle kosinski is live outside mandela's residence. michelle, this has been an all night, all day celebration, joyous celebration of mandela's life. >> it's just been incredible. you go through the crowd and you see the mix of people, all walks of life. we've seen babies and very old, black and white, really all races and faiths. people are gathered along a fence here outside of mandela's property. this morning it was a bare fence. this morning it is covered with flowers. the procession of people up and down the street has been absolutely nonstop. you
. >> the government has taken a firm decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> reporter: mandela emerged behind bars without bitterness to resume his campaign. >> africa. >> nelson mandela set aside his personal freedom for our personal freedoms. >> reporter: as south africa's first black president mandela remained a humble man, taking delight in a new york ticker tape parade. dancing at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. as promised he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> be south africa has been a despottic state throughout almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela is one of the best and optimistic qualities that he has to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man who has done his duty on earth. >> here with us now, a giant of civil rights. you got a chance to interview president mandela in february of 1990 after he came out of prison after 27 years. how did you finds him? how
comparisons with mr. mandela. mr. obama often noted privately and publicly that his sacrifices would never compare to mr. mandela's. aide to mr. obama said he was uncomfortable when people drew parallels between them as often as they did. this is from "the new york time times", not "the washington post." i apologize. how fair are those comparisons? they are inevitable and now we're going to continue to read and hear more about them over the next few days and weeks. how fair are they? >> it depends on which mr. mandela you're talking about. >> and which mr. obama you're talking about. >> one of the things that we talk about is mr. mandela as a tremendous humanitarian leader and so on. and he really was. but he was also a politician. and he also had to hold together a coalition, find the way to steer his country forward as the first black representative in that democratically elected government. in that way, they do have a great deal in common. you do see a very nervous and frightened group of white south africans wondering exactly what his presidency meant for them. and in some ways, you sa
decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> reporter: mandela emerged from behind bars without bitterness, to resume his campaign. >> africa. >> melson mandela sacrificed his personal freedom for our personal freedoms. >> reporter: his work was recognized with a nobel peace prize. as south africa's first black president, mandela remained a humble man. taking delight in a new york tickertape parade. dancing at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. >> so help me god. >> reporter: as promised, he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> south africa has been a despotic state through almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela's legacy stands against it. that is one of the best and most optimistic qualities that he hands to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts, the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man whos has done his duty on earth. >> keith miller reporting. joining us the council on foreign relations richard haas.
. it was the site of nelson mandela's first speech after his release from prison. mr. mandela's body will lie in state. his body will lie there in state for three days of public viewing. and then his body will travel home. it is expected that jimmy carter, bush the elder, bush the younger will all travel to south africa to pay their respects, to the extent that their health allows it. >>> the scale and burial is expected to match those of pope john paul and winston churchill and people of that magnitude. when dan rather said he should be considered the greatest leader of the second half of the 20th semplg century, that's how viewed. >>> as the details of the arrangements for the next few days emerge, we will bring them to you right here. that does it for us. thank you for being with us. . >>> the world reacts to the loss of a global icon as news spreads of nelson mandela's death. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> this morning we'll take
, this was not entirely unexpected news, given mr. mandela's health. how are south africans reacting? >> reporter: mara this was predictable news but painful none theless, announced late at night just before midnight south african time. many millions of south africans are still waking up to learn the news the father of this nation passed away during yesterday evening. first the mood here at nelson mandela's suburban home was fairly somber. now it is incredibly cell la braer to. people are bringing flowers, cheering, singing songs from the anti-apartheid struggle. they're celebrating his life and celebrating the lives they can now lead as a result of his anti-apartheid struggle. many people wondering here precisely what will happen next? what will the state event be. they're waiting for details about a lying in state which is expected in the next few days and about a burial which one american diplomat described as being the biggest state burial in the world since that of winston churhill. >> celebration of a remarkable life, rohit kachroo, thank you for that. >>> in so many ways nelson mandela is known
and to reflect on his life and then as the week progresses after the memorial service tomorrow, mr. mandela's body will lie in state at the union building and on sunday next week, the state funeral, the official funeral in his homeland homeland, very remote part of the country but where he wanted to be buried so, again, an emotional week, a long good-bye, a lot of mourning, but also a time to celebrate this life. >> ron allen for us, thank you. >>> we move to washington where a budget deal finally sounds imminent, "the washington post" reporting the finishing touches under way with a sealed deal expected on capitol hill. the first successful budget, of course, since 2011 but it amounts to little more than a cease-fire according to "the post" because the deal would not significantly reduce the $17.3 trillion in debt. it wouldn't close corporate tax loopholes. it wouldn't fully replace sequester cuts. in essence it appears it would just avoid another debt crisis on capitol hill. >>> a rare trip to pakistan for chuck hagel. it is the first trip there for a pentagon chief in three years. his me
anticipated that mr. mandela must go some time, that we really remain shocked that it has actually come to pass. i think that it's a shock filled with anxiety about life after nelson mandela. and i believe that every south african, wherever they stood in the apartheid years and wherever they've stood for the last 20 years, are absolutely united in their grief for nelson mandela's departure. and every south african are united, i hope, in the understanding that we need to emulate him. we need to live up to the values and the ideals that he had stood for and that we need to find our better selves in order for us to make us a success of south africa. >> is there love -- love for nelson mandela among white south africans as well? >> i think that there is enormous love. i don't think it started out that way. i think that when he was a prisoner, there was this fear of nelson mandela and the fact that after incarcerating him for 27 years, how angry must he be? how bitter will he be? how vengeful will he be? and in a very real way, he was able to surprise them. and slowly but surely, he began to
life of. >> robert makes a very important point. yet politics has not been absent in the days since mr. mandela's passing, kate. i think what had happened in some corners of the conservative blogosphere, twittersphere -- i'm not from the 20th century. please don't ask me to use these words. on his facebook page commenters, including this person who couldn't spend his name called him a commune nist involved in torture, terror, murder and they have lost a lot of respect for senator cruz. it's amazing to me the vitriol that exists in parts of american society. people like nelson mandela who should be a hero for everybody the world over and especially here in the united states. >> he was a political person so people are going to have political feelings about him. kudos to senator cruz for what's being said on his facebook and going. he obviously wanted to go. >> which is less about nelson mandela and more about ted cruz. jonathan, in fairness if we're talking about conservatives who are quote, unquote, doing the right thing, newt gingrich called nelson mandela one of the greatest leaders o
, the very same day that o'reilly was calling mr. mandela a communist last night, another fox news personality said about president obama on the same network, now, just hours earlier, listen to this. >> more class warfare, more radical wealth redistribution because this is who he is. he is essentially a statist. he is essentially a socialist. >> socialist, communist. so, i mean, this is almost like talking to sound bites being thrown around purposefully. >> they said the same things about dr. martin luther king jr. we can't judge what the obama presidency will be perceived 20 years from now. my suspicion is that a man that tried to make sure people had access to health care, i don't think they're going to say you know that's a lot like slavery or apartheid. i don't think that's going to be the legend of barack obama that we remember. >> you know, i think that people don't have a sense of how controversial these struggles were and how to fight opposition. i mean, i've been in the civil rights fight for the last several decades. and i remember the beginnings of the fight against apar
in a gathering with mr. mandela. i'll never forget, he said you cannot be afraid to grow and evolve. you have got to be willing to continue to grow, if you're going to be effective, and he grew. you've got to remember there were a lot of nationalist groups that said he had turned soft, sold out. there were a lot of different tensions there. he was able to withstand the hatred and opposition of the african, a whites and he was focused on democracy. >> he was incredibly tenacious in that he had the question of black nationalism versus the question of integration. eugene, you have a great piece and i'll read an exert of it today. we should remember not only the man who embraced his former enemies but also the man who refused to be bowed by those enemies, who remained militant despite 27 years of imprisonment who walked out of jail with his head held high and eyes toward the future. >> we think of nelson mandela and see that smile that's like sunshine. it just lights up anyplace. i only had the experience of meeting him once, it was in '94 and he was already nelson mandela. but before, long before, i
president, almost from his arrival, he assumed a kind of command the first time his lawyer visz ited him, mr. mandela greeted them and to their amaizment as my code of honor. the authorities began treating him as a prison elder statesman. >> you have to understand, nelson mandela grew up in a house of royalty, the king in his village or in the village next to his was where he grew up. so he had a royal bearing. and i think he commanded respect. and he knew that. he didn't throw it around but he used it when it was important. so i think that, you know, during his time in prison, he did in fact begin to -- even though he may not have realized that he would ever get out of prison, but he took the steps that were necessary both with his comrades and the younger ones and older ones to be in a position to rule if that time ever came. i think this was the faith that eventually they would succeed that kept them all going. >> i want to hear you talk about the reaction you're seeing coming out of south africa to his passing. is the sense of mourning and sense of south africa losing its father figure a
will remember most about mr. mandela that his spirit could not be restrained by economic injustices, metal bars, or the burden of hate and revenge. he taught us forgiveness on a grand scale. he was a spirit born free destined to soar above the rainbows. statement by mohammed ali. i want to bring on nbc's ron allen. he covered nelson mandela's 1994 election, and he's been back to south africa five times since 2011. thank you for being with me tonight. you were there in '94. i was there as an observer, an activist. you as a journalist. i was in the city of johannesbu johannesburg. give people a sense. i understand the greatness of nelson mandela. you have to understand that moment. the african -- the black african had never been able to vote before in south africa. >> right. >> give us a sense of what it was like in durbin in the non-city areas. >> right. this was a very rural area and we were beyond the city. and there were polling places that were essentially huts. and it was a very misty, foggy morning. and i can remember seeing these huts and these lines that stretched for literally for miles
of dignity for the african decent. his long walk to freedom, mr. mandela's constant fight for equality personified what my father often said injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. we showed briefly a second ago in new york city the apollo theatre marquis honors mandela. mayor bookberg announced he'll open a high school in honor of mandela. how much impact do you think mandela's life and times have on the civil rights movement and certainly during '80s and '90s when advocates demanded sanctions against apartheid in south africa. >> how much did it have? >> how much did it raise the credibility? >> tremendously. the fact the united states came on board. fortunately the united states came on board. it might have been a little late some would say. if you looked at other country they had come on board much earlier. what the united states did, students and universities started to say we want to divest our holdings in south africa. that was huge. when you impact a nation economically, then the community has to pay attention. business had to pay attention and say maybe these pol
to be with you. >> we see just in the live shot from there, people are celebrating mr. mandela's life and the impact that he made on all of us, but you're looking at the sheer number of people. there's no reason for us to expect there would be any violence, keeping the area secure with 95,000 people half the world leaders in this open air stadium is an incredible sikt as ron pointed out. >> it's an extremely complex undertaking. close to 100 heads of state and government attending and each of those leaders comes a delegat n delegation -- as he alluded to with regards to the stadium, obviously, security concerns that the south african and other security officials will be forced to deal with. >> politico is reporting shortly after the announcement on thursday that nelson mandela passed away, secret service and american military personnel were en route to prepare for president obama's arrival here. what would you compare this to in events that you worked on? the first thing for me that came in mind watching the pope in south america earlier this year, wherefore whatever reason the motor
in london. and two of his young daughters, mr. mandela's daughters were there and found out their father had passed during the premiere and they wanted you to continue showing the film. >> yeah. you know, it was an awful time. we did an opening, we spoke to the audience. i spoke personally about my dad who just passed and i based my character on -- i based his personality on my dad. and, you know, literally half an hour, 45 minutes into the film the news broke in amongst the cinema. and justin and myself and the producers, we went outside to sort of figure out what to do next, because it was awful. everyone was so in shock. and they said just keep going. let the film keep going. and then, you know, once the film, the credits started rolling, we went back on stage and we announced it. >> i want to play a clip from the film. in this scene, idris, you play a young mandela who goes to a theater and interrupts the movie to encourage people to fight apartheid. let's take a look. >> she is good looking, but you must give me sophia loren any day. we are the people of this nation but we don't have po
that is emanating from there. i have to say that i read with a chuckle about the first time that you met mr. mandela back in 1990. i want you to tell people because you were literally star struck. >> i absolutely was. i've been blessed to be around some phenomenal people, some great leaders, but there's no one like nelson mandela. so yes, the first time i was in his company was immediately after we had organized a glorious ticker tape for him parade down broadway in manhattan. we took him into city hall in new york, and had found myself alone with him in the mayor's office. and i didn't realize that i had been just staring at the man for probably ten minutes till i heard a voice say, excuse me, young man. can i trouble you for that glass of water. i realized that he had probably asked me several times for some water after being out in the heat and this long parade. i raced, got him the water and darn near spilled it all over him, i was so incredibly nervous and in awe of him. even though when you were around him, you were in awe, there was something about him that will created an accessibility, too.
interviewer. he said, mr. mandela, about the communists, and madiba said, well, they were the only ones that helped had us, next question. >> interesting. >> and moved right ahead. >> you afforded him a ticker tape parade down the canyon of heroes, which was reserved for very few. that's like amelia earhart, john glen, jesse owens. that was extraordinary. did he understand the significance of that? did he get it? >> oh, yes. he was a very wise man, and he understood the significance. later when we had a gathering at yankees sta yankees stadium, it must have been 60,000, 70,000 people. i put the yankee jacket around his shoulders and the cap, and he looked out at the crowd and said, now you know who i am. i am a yankee. and that went around the world. george steinbrenner was so impressed he said, i'll pay for it. >> you know that was impressive he was going to put out for that. how about the reception in harlem? what was that like? >> it was amazing. he spoke at 125th and lenox avenue, the site from which people like malcolm x and martin luther king and many had spoken earlier. here's th
of the congress, it is my great privilege and i deem it a high honor and personal pleasure to present to you mr. nelson mandela, deputy president of the african national congr s congress. >> it was a news congress back in 1990, crowds of americans, black person americans, all sorts of americans turned out in droves for the chance to be in the presence of, in the remote vicinity of men of rare courage, character and compassion. you probably heard of a bronx cheer. check out what happened when nelson mandela showed up at yankee stadium back then. >> you now know who i am. i am a yankee! [ cheers ] . >> and i don't even think a red sox fan would mind that. i speak as a red sox fan. you would never know, though, looking at that scene, for nelson mandela to be there at yankee stadium for him to stand on capitol hill and be hailed by democrats and republicans in congress. for that trip to the united states to happen back in 1990, nelson mandela had to receive a special waiver from the u.s. department of state. otherwise, he never would have been allowed in the country. that's because he was a member
on "jansing and co." back in june about nelson mandela's legacy. in a statement following his death, mrs. evers said, quote, we are all students of mandela for he taught us about faith, perseverance, and devotion to one's ideals. morgan freeman, sydney patiya both portrayed him in films. the long walk to freedom chronicles his life from childhood through his inauguration. it also looks at his relationship with his wife winnie played by naomi harris. and the film's director justin chadwick talked to me about the film. >> we all know mandela the great political leader, the activist, but we don't know him as a young man. as a man who loved cars, tailoring, who is the most amazing lawyer in his early days in the first black lawyer in johannesburg. so we want to explore a mandela that hadn't been seen before that people don't know, that's not in the history books. >> last night prince william and his wife kate attend the uk premiere for that film in london. they along with the rest of the audience found out about his death while the credits were rolling. >> we're just reminded of what an extr
will leave it there. thanks for coming in. >> thank you. >> up next, remembering nelson mandela, the president and mrs. obama are on the way to south africa right now for what is becoming a massive memorial, perhaps the largest in world history. heads of state will be gagering to pay respects. it will be a security nightmare for agents around the world. >> cans on across the country thanks to a wintry mix. we will have none other than jim cantore who will be live from the snowy northeast. a look ahead at the politics planner. >> it will bed bidens for them for a holiday celebration. you are watching "the daily rundown" only on msnbc. once upon a time, an insurance clerk stumbled upon a cottage. [knock] no one was at home, but on the kitchen table sat three insurance policies. the first had lots of coverage. the second, only a little. but the third was... just right! bear: hi! yeah, we love visitors. that's why we moved to a secluded house in the middle of the wilderness. just the right coverage at just the right price. coverage checker from progressive. you may be muddling throu
a realist on the other side of the table. >> mr. delms, when i was talking about nelson mandela right before he was officially elected, he gave a lot of credit to the united states. i thought he was being very generous in saying our country was the most -- enemy of the world. do you think united states a as major player in getting him liber liberated and getting his party majority rule? >> i think he did, chris. with all due respect to the gentleman on the show with me and i don't discount his comments, but a journalist did come to the united states several years later and said he had done research and that his research indicated that a telephone call took place between f.w. de clark and margaret thatcher wherein he asked her what should i do. margaret thatcher's response was, the dellums bill passed on a voice vote two years ago. it passed just recently on a record vote. the democrats now control the senate. it will pass the senate. it will become law. he said, then what should i do. her response was, free mandela and begin to negotiate a new south africa while you have leverage, because th
&a book, with information from experts on your condition. >>> the morning after nelson mandela's decisive victory in 1994, brian williams was the first american journalist to speak with the new president-elect. brian began by asking president-elect nelson mandela about his predecessor f.w. declerk. >> my relations with mr. declerk are very good. he is one of those south africans i hold in high regard. we have had differences. we have said cruel things against each other. but at the end of the day, we're able to shake hands and to think in the interests of south africa, and he has had an experience which i have not had. and if my organization comes out with a majority in this elections, i will have to depend very much on his support, his experience. >> what happens when nelson mandela has to use force against elements of south africa's black community? are you willing and able to take on the political pressures that will take place? >> i don't expect that the government has succeeding governments would rely on a solution on force. we depend on the people. we depend on persuasion, and i don
. with his plan to name a black ambassador now on hold, mr. reagan was left proposing ref m reforms south africa, a timetable for end ago part hide, release of political prisoners including mandela and discussions with black groups including the african national congress. the president stressed all south africans must work out their future together. >> as one african remarked recently, southern africa is like a zebra. if the white parts are injured, the black parts will die, too. >> and reagan did have some allies in congress. >> by intruding into the affairs of the south african government, we are shooting the farmers of america in the foot. and i will have no part of it. >> in the end, for all of ronald reagan's charisma and persuasive ability, for all his sway over congressional republicans, both houses of congress voted to impose the sanctions. and even after reagan vetoed the measure, both the house and senate went back and voted to override his veto. and it wasn't just the usual suspects fighting reagan. the senate was controlled at the time by republicans. this was an open revolt f
stunning, saying thicks like go home, ted, you're drunk. he, mandela, was communist terrorist and targeted people for no other reason than being white. stunned to see you support this scumb scumbag, mr. cruz. he was a communist, a huge supporter of abortion. putting him in the same language of stalin, fdr, who are also dead and don't deserve a eulogy either. what does that tell us about the generations reflecting on this? >> shocking comments. these are ted cruz's ostensible supporters. how incredibly disturbing must it be for americans to read that, to say this is -- this vein of political thought, however large or small it is, exists in our country. >> i hope it's disturbing to us. >> i hope so. >> i'm mostly disturbed that maybe it isn't disturbing to us. >> obviously americans who agree with it, they're out there. i can't imagine it's a very large population, but it saez lot about people have asked for a long time what's the racial perspective of tea party members. unfortunately this is the perspective of some of them. >> remember, where you started the conversation about dr. king, i w
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